Chun Jie <3! Happy Spring Festival! 

Chun Jie <3! Happy Spring Festival! 

guymeloy:

entelijan:

tontonmichel:

It’s Supergirl: 5-year-old Queens prodigy can speak seven languages, play six instruments
BY ERICA PEARSON / DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Seven languages. Six musical instruments. Two types of dance and two sports. It all adds up to one busy little Queens girl.
Five-year-old Mabou Loiseau’s parents spend $1,500 a week on tutors and lessons - and she spends seven hours a day in some type of instruction, with Sundays off.
She grew up speaking French, Creole and English, but her immigrant parents didn’t want to stop there. She’s also learning Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic and Russian.
"Russian is my most favorite. I just hear something, and if I don’t understand I say, ‘What does that mean?’ and they’ll tell me," said Mabou, whose Laurelton house is plastered with flashcards in different languages.
She can sing her ABCs in Spanish, count in Mandarin, read fairytales in Russian, and already has an ambitious list of career goals.
"I want to be a firefighter, and I want to be a doctor, and I want to be a dancer, and I want to be a princess," Mabou said with a smile, sitting shyly on her mom’s lap. "And I want to be an actor, and I want to be a musician, and I want to be a singer, and I want to be a veterinarian, and I want to be a mom."
Mabou has her own dance studio with a mirrored wall where she learns tap and ballet. Her mom recently got rid of the kitchen table to make room for a full-size drum set. She’s also learning to play the harp, clarinet, violin, guitar and piano. When she’s not taking ice-skating or swimming lessons.
"All the sacrifices in the world for her," said her mom, Esther Loiseau, a piano teacher who taught French at an American school before leaving Haiti for Queens 15 years ago. "Furniture is not important. Education is."
Loiseau, 47, said friends and neighbors were initially shocked that she was starting Mabou on such a regimen so early - instead of just letting her be a kid.
"But I make sure I leave enough time for her to play," Loiseau said. "All she knows is learning. What becomes fun for someone is what they know."
Loiseau tells the tutors to play with Mabou, speaking in their native language, for half of the lesson. They spend the other half reading, writing and practicing vocabulary.
She said a sure way to make the opinionated only child behave is to threaten to cancel one of her lessons - especially Russian.
"It’s a great experience for me, honestly. A lot of even adult people can’t understand what she does," said Rogneda Elagina, 24, Mabou’s Russian tutor. "We like to read together … we started with the alphabet and connecting letters, and now she can read real folklore."
Mabou’s dad works 16 hours a day as a parking attendant in Manhattan to pay for everything, and the Loiseaus have also started hosting other students for classes at their house.
The proud parents homeschool Mabou but found out last week that she scored in the 99th percentile on the city test for gifted and talented schools.
"Honestly, I just want to open doors for my daughter," said Loiseau. "She is really my princess."
epearson@nydailynews.com

This is great

no it’s not it’s called hot-housing and it’s developmentally inappropriate. Kids like this can easily crash and burn. Early accelerated development often drops off - she is far from guaranteed to remain that far ahead of the pack forever and an unhealthy emotional dynamic may develop in the family if she fails to fulfill extreme expectations, especially considering the level of financial sacrifice that is being made. Speaking of which she needs time with her father more than she needs him to work sixteen hours a day to pay for her lessons. There are ways of nurturing the qualities of gifted children without pressuring them to DO ALL THE THINGS.

guymeloy:

entelijan:

tontonmichel:

It’s Supergirl: 5-year-old Queens prodigy can speak seven languages, play six instruments

BY ERICA PEARSON / DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Seven languages. Six musical instruments. Two types of dance and two sports. It all adds up to one busy little Queens girl.

Five-year-old Mabou Loiseau’s parents spend $1,500 a week on tutors and lessons - and she spends seven hours a day in some type of instruction, with Sundays off.

She grew up speaking French, Creole and English, but her immigrant parents didn’t want to stop there. She’s also learning Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic and Russian.

"Russian is my most favorite. I just hear something, and if I don’t understand I say, ‘What does that mean?’ and they’ll tell me," said Mabou, whose Laurelton house is plastered with flashcards in different languages.

She can sing her ABCs in Spanish, count in Mandarin, read fairytales in Russian, and already has an ambitious list of career goals.

"I want to be a firefighter, and I want to be a doctor, and I want to be a dancer, and I want to be a princess," Mabou said with a smile, sitting shyly on her mom’s lap. "And I want to be an actor, and I want to be a musician, and I want to be a singer, and I want to be a veterinarian, and I want to be a mom."

Mabou has her own dance studio with a mirrored wall where she learns tap and ballet. Her mom recently got rid of the kitchen table to make room for a full-size drum set. She’s also learning to play the harp, clarinet, violin, guitar and piano. When she’s not taking ice-skating or swimming lessons.

"All the sacrifices in the world for her," said her mom, Esther Loiseau, a piano teacher who taught French at an American school before leaving Haiti for Queens 15 years ago. "Furniture is not important. Education is."

Loiseau, 47, said friends and neighbors were initially shocked that she was starting Mabou on such a regimen so early - instead of just letting her be a kid.

"But I make sure I leave enough time for her to play," Loiseau said. "All she knows is learning. What becomes fun for someone is what they know."

Loiseau tells the tutors to play with Mabou, speaking in their native language, for half of the lesson. They spend the other half reading, writing and practicing vocabulary.

She said a sure way to make the opinionated only child behave is to threaten to cancel one of her lessons - especially Russian.

"It’s a great experience for me, honestly. A lot of even adult people can’t understand what she does," said Rogneda Elagina, 24, Mabou’s Russian tutor. "We like to read together … we started with the alphabet and connecting letters, and now she can read real folklore."

Mabou’s dad works 16 hours a day as a parking attendant in Manhattan to pay for everything, and the Loiseaus have also started hosting other students for classes at their house.

The proud parents homeschool Mabou but found out last week that she scored in the 99th percentile on the city test for gifted and talented schools.

"Honestly, I just want to open doors for my daughter," said Loiseau. "She is really my princess."

epearson@nydailynews.com

This is great

no it’s not it’s called hot-housing and it’s developmentally inappropriate. Kids like this can easily crash and burn. Early accelerated development often drops off - she is far from guaranteed to remain that far ahead of the pack forever and an unhealthy emotional dynamic may develop in the family if she fails to fulfill extreme expectations, especially considering the level of financial sacrifice that is being made. Speaking of which she needs time with her father more than she needs him to work sixteen hours a day to pay for her lessons. There are ways of nurturing the qualities of gifted children without pressuring them to DO ALL THE THINGS.

(via tontonmichel)

frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.

Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.

The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.

When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.

Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.

Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.

There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.

Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.

Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.

One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.

(via cobenjstorer)

iMiss My Sistas…

Living in Shanghai has afforded me the opportunity of building amazing friendships with beautiful women from all over the world. Yet something is missing.

Here we are before my departure to China…

…and here they are after.

I’m missing.

I’m missing beach days and birthdays…gossip and merlot…arguments and make-ups…house parties and Ghanaian films…the profound connection between Black women. I’m missing my sistas. 

tolkienegro:

“the day will come when history will speak….” -patrice
Day Trip to Nanjing: On the way back to the Hai&#8230; Bye bye Nanjing. 

Day Trip to Nanjing: On the way back to the Hai… Bye bye Nanjing. 

Day Trip to Nanjing: 7-Eleven&#8217;s evil twin&#8230; 

Day Trip to Nanjing: 7-Eleven’s evil twin… 

Day Trip to Nanjing: Ming Tombs Garden 

Day Trip to Nanjing: Ming Tombs Garden 

Day Trip to Nanjing: Ming Tombs 

Day Trip to Nanjing: Ming Tombs 

Day Trip to Nanjing: En route to the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum 

Day Trip to Nanjing: En route to the Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum